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Posts tagged with 'programming'

Apache Commons Text

kinow @ Jan 07, 2017 20:39:03

There is a new component in Apache Commons: Apache Commons Text. The 1.0 release might be announced in the next weeks. The current site is still in the Commons Sandbox, but it will change with the 1.0 release. The promotion from the sandbox happened a few days ago in the project mailing list.

Here’s the project description: Apache Commons Text is a library focused on algorithms working on strings.

There was a thread on the mailing list some time ago (Oct/2014) when we first discussed the component idea. Since then many people contributed porting code from Apache Commons Lang, Apache Lucene, donating code from existing projects, and with new ideas.

It is important to be aware that certain parts of Apache Commons Lang are being marked as deprecated, and will be removed in the future, after Apache Commons Text 1.0 is out. For example: StringUtils, and RandomStringUtils.

That will happen probably in a 4.x release of Apache Commons Lang, if everything goes well with Apache Commons Text :-)

And there are already future features in branches too. It was decided that these features needed further work, so they will probably be included in next releases.

So that’s a little bit of background on the new component that will be released soon. If you have code using Apache Commons Lang, you might be interested in staying tuned to release announcements in the mailing list!

And should you have suggestions and would like to contribute, feel free to join and start a thread in the mailing list, open a JIRA issue, or submit a pull request.

Happy hacking!

Contributing to Krita

kinow @ Jan 03, 2017 11:40:03

As I mentioned in the last post, I have been learning Qt and using C and C++ again. Since I used C and C++ more during university (about 10 years ago, phew), decided to read real code.

I used Photoshop, Illustrator, and Fireworks a lot when I was younger and had more time to spend drawing. But some time ago I switched to Inkscape for vector graphics, which I use at work for presentations. So it was only natural to try Krita now.

Since I was going to try Krita, I thought why not check out and build from source, and then in case I found any bugs, contribute back? Or maybe from time to time triage issues, find low hanging ones, and send a patch?

Well, turns out the Krita project has a great community, and it is super easy to send contributions. So far I submitted three patches, some were included in 3.x releases.

While the patches are rather small, they are suggestions on how to fix memory segmentation faults, or strange behaviours in the interface. For these issues, I had to learn more about Qt components, signals and emitting events, and, of course, work with pointers, arrays, Qt data structures, etc. In other words, lots of (geek) fun!

In other words, by contributing to Krita, I am not only helping the project and giving a little back to the community, but also refreshing my memory on C and C++, and slowly learning Qt - which is not very hard if you worked with Swing/AWT, Delphi, Visual Basic, Gtk, etc.

What are you waiting to contribute to Krita? The developers that maintain the project answer tickets and questions posted to reddit in a good time, and are extremely easy to work with.

Read more here how to build from source, and here on how to submit patches.

Happy hacking!

Debugging an application that freezes the X server

kinow @ Jan 02, 2017 00:39:03

Some time ago, I decided to start writing C++ again, and picked Krita for that. Krita is written in C++ and Qt. The bug I was working on involved a memory issue when changing the UI.

The problem was that this UI change would result in, not only Krita, but the whole X server freezing. My set up was basically Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, with Eclipse, Qt5, and the latest version of Krita checked out via git.

Initially I spent some time looking at the logs, tracing the binary, even downloaded some Qt utility tools to look at the events and what was happening with the application when it froze.

However, eventually I realized I was going to spend more time on this part of the issue, rather than on the memory bug. So decided to look for a work-around.

Thankfully someone else blogged about a similar issue and saved me a lot of time :-) Here’s how I did it, following the instructions in this blog post.

$ sudo apt-get install xnest -y
$ cd krita_install/
$ Xnest :10
$ twm -display :10
$ export DISPLAY=:10
$ ./krita

That’s it. You should have Krita running in a separate window, with Xnest, and within this window the twm window manager running. So when it freezes, at least you can still debug your application in Eclipse or whatever IDE you prefer.

Happy hacking!

Performance problems in Jenkins TAP Plug-in — part 1

kinow @ Sep 03, 2016 23:28:03

JENKINS-17887 reports performance problems in the Jenkins TAP Plug-in. It also lists a series of suggestions on how to improve the Jenkins TAP Plug-in performance. On this initial post, we will get a general idea of how the plug-in performs for large projects.

BioPerl has over 21K tests. That should be enough for giving an initial idea of CPU, memory and disk usage for the plug-in.

git clone https://github.com/bioperl/bioperl-live.git
cd bioperl-live
sudo cpanm  -vv --installdeps --notest .
sudo cpanm Set::Scalar Graph::Directed XML::LibXML XML::SAX \
    SVG XML::Parser::PerlSAX Convert::Binary::C XML::SAX::Writer \
    XML::DOM::XPath Spreadsheet::ParseExcel XML::SAX::Writer \
    XML::DOM HTML::TableExtract XML::Simple Test::Pod DBI
prove -r t/ -a tests.tar.gz

All tests successful.
Files=325, Tests=21095, 94 wallclock secs ( 2.47 usr  0.55 sys + 88.29 cusr  3.85 csys = 95.16 CPU)
Result: PASS

When the test results are parsed, the plug-in also copies TAP files over to the master, in a folder called tap-master-files.

The BioPerl tests are not really big, just 1.7M. It gets doubled as there will be the workspace copy, and the tap-master-files directory copy, so 3.4M.

But several objects get created in memory, and persisted into the build.xml job file. BioPerl generates a build.xml file with 11M. So less than 15M. But the build.xml contains objects that are read via XStream by Jenkins and into the memory.

The build page with the graph, and the other two test result pages are rendering in more than 10 seconds in my computer. But the CPU load is OK, so a closer look at the memory use would probably be more interesting.

JENKINS-17887 YourKit profiler

The image shows one of the screens in YourKit profiler, where it is possible to see that org.tap4j.plugin.model.TapTestResultResult has over 6 million objects.

One build.xml for the BioPerl project gets over 80K entries for the TestResult object.

grep "org.tap4j.model.TestResult" builds/1/build.xml -o | wc -l
84522

This happens because each TAP file may contain multiple test results (lines with test results). Each of these test results gets turned into a Java object and loaded by the plug-in. So when loading the test result pages, Jenkins needs to wait until all these objects have been parsed, deserialized and read into the memory.

The next post will continue on code improvements, and another benchmark.

Happy profiling!

Revamping Frege logo — part 2

kinow @ Aug 24, 2016 23:54:03

Last time I used Blender was around 2007 I think, in University. But the bad weather in Auckland gives me plenty of time to have fun checking out Blender again :-)

Followed the following tutorials:

Here are the work in progress, created only with the bézier curve.

Frege updated logo

Frege 3D #1

Frege 3D #2

Frege 3D #3

Frege 3D #4

Frege 3D #5

Frege 3D #6

Frege 3D #7

Here’s the result after the mesh was created, and some material applied.

Frege 3D #8

Then using a plane as background, replacing the lamp by a sun, and tweaking a few parameters.

Frege 3D #9

And finally playing with animation. Not sure if there was a time line and animation controls in Blender the last time I used it, but the controls are not really complex.

I had to combine both meshes into a single object, in order to add a bone and rotate it. That is why the logo got back to a single material. The angle of the camera could probably do with some tweaking as well.

Frege 3D #10

But it was my very first time animating in Blender. Some day if I get access to one of those 3D printers, I will check what are the requirements for printing this logo.

Blender models can be downloaded here.

Now back to programming :-)