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Revamping Frege logo — part 2

kinow @ Aug 24, 2016 23:54:03

Last time I used Blender was around 2007 I think, in University. But the bad weather in Auckland gives me plenty of time to have fun checking out Blender again :-)

Followed the following tutorials:

Here are the work in progress, created only with the bézier curve.

Frege updated logo

Frege 3D #1

Frege 3D #2

Frege 3D #3

Frege 3D #4

Frege 3D #5

Frege 3D #6

Frege 3D #7

Here’s the result after the mesh was created, and some material applied.

Frege 3D #8

Then using a plane as background, replacing the lamp by a sun, and tweaking a few parameters.

Frege 3D #9

And finally playing with animation. Not sure if there was a time line and animation controls in Blender the last time I used it, but the controls are not really complex.

I had to combine both meshes into a single object, in order to add a bone and rotate it. That is why the logo got back to a single material. The angle of the camera could probably do with some tweaking as well.

Frege 3D #10

But it was my very first time animating in Blender. Some day if I get access to one of those 3D printers, I will check what are the requirements for printing this logo.

Blender models can be downloaded here.

Now back to programming :-)

Revamping Frege logo

kinow @ Aug 16, 2016 23:54:03

For a while I had been wanting to try adding a flat colour to the Frege logo. This weekend had some bit of spare time, and here is the result.

Submitted to the project as pull request #299.

Current logo.

Frege current logo

And the updated logo.

Frege updated logo

The colour used was Flamingo (#EF4836), found in Flat UI Color Picker.

Perhaps not exactly revamping, since all I did was just change a colour. There were adjustments to the bézier curves as well, to better align them, but I updated both logos, not just the new one :-)

Reading notes about DRMAA v2

kinow @ Jul 20, 2016 19:59:03

The DRMAA v2 specification draft is ready to be published, and is in public comment until 31st July this year. I used DRMAA v1 to integrate Jenkins and PBS some time ago, but it was not a very elegant solution.

And in the end integrating other grid computing implementations like SGE would not be very simple.

This post contains my reading notes for DRMAA v2, and a short analysis of how this new specification could be used in a new tentative to integrate Jenkins and several grid computing implementations in a single plug-in.

( Read more ... )

Reasons for having pt and pt-BR in a software

kinow @ Jul 17, 2016 14:14:03

Some time ago I found some spare time to work on a different Open Source project: SKOSMOS. SKOSMOS is a web based SKOS browser and publishing tool, used to create vocabularies using the SKOS ontology.

I decided to help with translation, but there was no Brazilian Portuguese option, only Portuguese. I used a few arguments to suggest that having Brazilian Portuguese would be a good thing.

Another Open Source project that I use in a side project is LanguageTool. LanguageTool is used for proof-reading, and uses rules to find spelling and grammar errors.

Today I saw a message in the LanguageTool mailing list discussing whether having a Brazilian Portuguese page would make sense, or if it would be better to have just Portuguese, and then add rules for special cases.

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Processing Vaisala Radiosonde data with Python, and creating GRUAN-like NetCDF files

kinow @ Jul 12, 2016 21:18:03

One of my last projects involved parsing a few GB’s of data that was in a certain binary format, and convert it into NetCDF files. In this post I will describe what was done, what I learned about radiosonde, GRUAN and other geek stuff. Ready?

Vaisala Radiosonde data

When I was told the data was in some binary format, I thought it would be similar to parsing a flat file. That this would contain a fixed length entry, with the same kind of item repeated multiple times.

Well, not exactly.

The files had been generated by an instrument made by Vaisala, a Finnish company. This instrument is called a radiosonde. It is an instrument about the size of an old mobile phone, that is launched with a balloon into the atmosphere.

I was lucky to be given the chance to release one of these balloons carrying a newer version of this equipment.

Radiosonde balloon launch

The balloon can carry equipments for measuring different things, like air pressure, altitude, temperature, latitude, longitude, relative humidity, among others. Equipments like the radiosonde send the data back to a ground-level station via radio, normally in a short and constant interval.

( Read more ... )